BTO Interior Design - A lookbook for your future home!


BTO Interior Design - A lookbook for your future home!

"BTO ai mai?" is now the Singaporean term for asking a significant other to spend the rest of their life with you! Planning for your first home can be a daunting process and with so many factors to consider, it can get quite overwhelming. 

Here at Homely, we created a BTO series to hopefully make the BTO planning process a little easier for new flat owners. We will be sharing a curated range of sought-after styles for you to consider when designing your new home in the next few blog posts!

Today, we will be featuring the Scandinavian, minimalist, and modern design. Continue reading to gain some inspiration for your next home!

Scandinavian design was first introduced in 1954 through a design show titled “Scandinavian design” - which aimed to display the works of Nordic designers’, as well as encourage the perfect balance between functionality and beauty in interior design. The Scandinavian design focuses primarily on functionality and simplicity, without compromising on the beauty of the home.

Image: https://www.homeguide.com.sg/understanding-scandinavian-interior-design/

Some features of a Scandinavian home design includes the use of natural materials such as leather and wood, particularly pale wood, to give off that cosy environment and create a holiday vibe. The colours of a Scandinavian home would usually feature the Nordic color palette - white, off-white and gray hues, essentially colours that are muted and light! Clean lines and solid pieces are also defining features of a Scandinavian design, which means that excessive or bold details are a no-no.

Image: https://www.contemporist.com/10-common-features-of-scandinavian-interior-design/

You might wonder, how can I achieve the Scandinavian look for my home? Natural lights. This might sound ridiculous, but hear us out! The reason why natural lights are an important aspect of a Scandinavian home design is because Scandinavian countries experience polar nights, where night time can last for more than 24 hours, so they would always try to maximise natural light design! To get the most natural light in your home, sheer curtains can be used to allow light to seep in without being too harsh for the eyes, softening the home’s lighting. 

Scandinavian design makes the whole home feel warm and cosy, which is why it is no surprise that it is one of the most popular designs among homeowners in Singapore. With Work-From-Home (WFH) arrangement being a norm now, a comfortable home to live and work in is extra important for optimal productivity! Therefore, this design is definitely one to consider for your upcoming home.

Next up, we have the Minimalist design. Although minimalism has been around for a long time, it only started to really gain traction and popularity in recent years, where more people began to live a minimalist lifestyle. This could be due to the influence of Marie Kondo, encouraging people to only keep things that spark joy! 

A minimalist design focuses on using the bare essentials to create a simple and clean space - which means more emphasis is placed on the function. Not only do every piece of furniture need to add value to the space, form is also important. The different furniture placed in the area must work well together in its basic shape, in its purest form. Else, it would not fit the minimalist design.

Image: https://www.home-designing.com/minimalist-style-living-room-interior-designs-with-minimalist-furniture

Minimalist design uses neutral colour tones like beige, white or grey - colours that are not too eye-catching so that they can fade into the background to create the soft and airy look. At this point, Minimalist design might sound really similar to Scandinavian design, but the difference lies in their accessibility! Because it’s foundation is practicality, Scandinavian design can suit your personal definition of what works and what doesn’t, making it more accessible than a minimalist design. Thus, if there was a quote for a minimalist interior, it would definitely be “Simplicity at its best”! 

Lastly, we have the modern design. The modern style was first introduced in the early to mid-1900s, and has been around ever since. This design has been linked to contemporary design, but it is important to note the difference in those two: Modern design refers to an era that has passed, while contemporary design is ever-evolving.

Image: https://www.decorilla.com/online-decorating/modern-vs-contemporary-interior-design-style/

The rule of thumb for modern design: Clean lines over curvy lines. Neutral tones and natural materials over bold hues and synthetic materials and patterns. This helps to create the sleek look of a modern home, giving it a clean finish. Despite the talks about neutral tones in modern homes, art pieces are an exception! Art is essential to modern interior design, so it is completely fine to hang art pieces with bold colours on walls. 

Image: https://www.housebeautiful.com/design-inspiration/a23513276/modern-design-style/

Having an open floor plan is one way that you can make your home look more modern! The idea is having as few walls as possible, and instead making use of furniture to differentiate the spaces in the home. This can mean having an open dining concept, and using the kitchen countertop as a distinct way of ‘separating’ the living room from the dining room, without the use of walls! 

Homely hoped you found this blog helpful and might try out 1 or 2 hacks from here. Head down to our Instagram @homely.global for more bite-sized tips and tricks for your anything revolving around the concept Home.